Chemical Hair Dye

Chemical hair dye is a health hazard.

Some of the most common and dangerous ingredients used in hair dyes are :
  • ammonia
  • peroxide
  • p-phenylenediamine (PPD)
  • diaminobenzene
  • toluene-2,5-diamine
  • resorcinol

Between them, and more, they spell : RISK which  must be carefully evaluated, and patch tested, before every hair dye application.

Here’s a list of the seven most toxic common chemicals found in hair dye :

https://www.theepochtimes.com/avoid-these-7-toxic-chemicals-found-in-most-hair-dyes_2040018.html

Sadly, they are all potentially harmful and ought to be considered a health hazard. 

use chemical hair dye at your own risk; woman in bikini contemplating entering the ocean , standing by a shark warning sign
use chemical hair dye at your own risk

 

Diaminophenoxyethanol

EUROPEAN SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE ON CONSUMER PRODUCTS classify it as

safe ! http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_risk/committees/04_sccp/docs/sccp_o_042.pdf

The Dangers of Paraphenylene Diamene / PPD Hair Dyes

The truth is that there is no such thing as “black henna” or “colour henna”. There is only one henna plant and its scientific or botanical name is lawsonia inermis. It produces an orange red colour and nothing else, unless it’s mixed with something else – the crucial question is whether that “something else” is natural or chemical. “Chemical”, in my view, spells danger and even death. PPD is chemical.

The following links which explain the hazards of PPD :

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/1934496.stm

http://dermnetnz.org/dermatitis/paraphenylenediamine-allergy.html

Dangers of diaminophenol

http://physchem.ox.ac.uk/MSDS/DI/2,4-diaminophenol_dihydrochloride.html

 

Look for Pure Hair Dye, not Chemical Hair Dye 

Once you understand what PPD is and learn to recognise the common chemicals in hair dye, you’re armed with information to help you make an informed choice. Watch out because even some packets of “henna” have “paraphenylene diamene” listed as an ingredient in tiny print on the leaflet inside the box. Research also reveals that many brands sold as “natural henna” which don’t contain paraphenylene diamene DO contain green dyes which are not listed as additives and which made the powder look artificially fresh lime green in colour, thus rendering the henna impure and adulterated. Real henna is not bright green or any shade of lime green ; it’s more a dull khaki, kind of “mud”green.